The Microbiome with Anne Estes, Phd

23 Jan The Microbiome with Anne Estes, Phd

In this episode of Yoga | Birth | Babies, I had the opportunity to speak with microbiome scientist and mom, Anne M Estes, Phd. She enlightened me about the incredible world of microbiomes in relationship to a healthy pregnancy, birth and your newborn baby.

Topics covered:

What is microbiome and why is it important to consider?

Pregnancy:
What can effect the mother and baby’s microbiome during pregnancy?
How the mother can change the microbiome in the vagina and gut?
GBS, what it is, why it can be a problem and are there ways to manage it?
Dispelling the whacky home remedies for GBS
The effects of antibiotics on microbiome for GBS positive moms

Labor and birth:
The function of healthy vaginal microbiome play in delivery
The benefits of the baby receiving the mother’s micro biome during a vaginal delivery
The differences seen in terms of microbiome on the newborn with a baby born vaginally and one born cesarean
Does the laboring process change the micro biome of the baby
Seeding a baby who was born via c-section
The bigger impact on society with 1/3 of babies being born via cesarean in terms of the micro biomes that they are not receiving
How breastfeeding impacts baby’s gut and immune system
The difference in the micro biome of breastfed babies to that of formula fed babies

About Anne:

Anne M. Estes, PhD is the human host of the microbiome blog, Mostly Microbes. As a microbiome scientist and mom, she is passionate about distilling the rapidly developing microbiome literature for parents, childbirth educators, and medical professionals so they can make informed medical and lifestyle decisions. Anne has two girls, ages 3 and 8, who inspire her to come up with creative ways to teach everyone about the amazing world of microbes. She is also a contributing blogger to the Lamaze International blog, Science and Sensibility, and MicroBE.net, an academic blog about the microbiome of built environments. She is also a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Genome Sciences in Baltimore, MD, where she studies how microbes and their animal hosts work together throughout host development.

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